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Framingham State University Resources for DACA and Undocumented Students: Home

What is DACA?

Consideration of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA)

On June 15, 2012, the Secretary of Homeland Security announced that certain people who came to the United States as children and meet several guidelines may request consideration of deferred action for a period of two years, subject to renewal. They are also eligible for work authorization. Deferred action is a use of prosecutorial discretion to defer removal action against an individual for a certain period of time. Deferred action does not provide lawful status.

UPDATE: On Sept. 5, 2017, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) initiated the orderly phase out of the program known as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). DHS will provide a limited, six-month window during which it will consider certain requests for DACA and applications for work authorization, under specific parameters.

The Department of Homeland Security will only adjudicate DACA renewal requests for current beneficiaries whose benefits will expire between September 5, 2017 and March 5, 2018.  If your EAD expires between those dates your renewal application must be received by Oct. 5, 2017 to be adjudicated.

Initial requests for DACA (for people who have never benefited from the program before), will no longer be accepted by the Department of Homeland Security. If you filed an initial request for an EAD on or before Sept. 5, 2017, the agency should adjudicate the application if it was properly filed.

Advance parole (travel document) requests associated with DACA will no longer be approved, regardless of when Form I-131 was filed.

Framingham State University President Cevallos Statement of Support for Undocumented Students

Dear Members of the FSU Community,

I’m writing to you in response to the Trump Administration’s decision today to phase out the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) immigration policy within the next six months. I’m sure there are many of you wondering how this decision is going to impact you, your family or someone you know.

I want you to know that the Framingham State University community supports you and we are going to do anything in our power to ensure the protections offered through DACA are maintained in the Commonwealth. 

As many of you know, most DACA students were brought to the United States as children and often have no memory of their native country. This is their only home. As Governor Charlie Baker stated earlier today, DACA students comprise “approximately 8,000 young Massachusetts residents who are right now serving in our military, attending our schools and contributing to our economy while striving to give back to their communities."

I join with other Massachusetts leaders in calling on Congress to take quick and decisive action to find a permanent legislative solution that will maintain protections for the nation’s DACA residents. In the meantime, there is action that we can take at the state level to minimize the impact of today’ decision.

Earlier today, the Council of Presidents for the State University System sent a letter to Massachusetts House Speaker Robert DeLeo and Senate President Stanley Rosenberg urging immediate legislative action to ensure DACA students living in Massachusetts will continue to qualify for in-state tuition rates, regardless of today’s action by the federal government. Moving forward, I promise to keep you apprised of additional steps we are taking to support DACA students and ways you can help advocate on their behalf.

To those of you who may have questions or concerns about how today’s decision could impact you or your family, I encourage you to contact Dr. Lorretta Holloway, Vice President for Enrollment and Student Development, at lholloway@framingham.edu, or Millie Gonzalez, our Chief Officer of Diversity, Inclusion & Community Engagement, at vgonzalez@framingham.edu.

BHE President Carlos Santiago Statement of Support for DACA Students

Dear Members of the MA Board of Higher Education:

By now you are all aware of the unfortunate decision of the administration in Washington DC to discontinue the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. Governor Charlie Baker has spoken out against the decision. Likewise, all across this nation higher education institutions, their leadership, academic associations, and non-governmental organizations have denounced this unfortunate decision. I join my colleague presidents at our community colleges, state universities, and UMass campuses in Massachusetts in their opposition as well. They have spoken eloquently about the need to ensure students continue their education and they know firsthand the importance of student success for the future of the Massachusetts economy.

Although I was not born in the continental United States, I was born in a US territory where citizenship was granted in 1917. It was the luck of the draw where I was granted citizenship yet others (through no fault of their own) have not been as fortunate. But we all share a common ideal that if you study hard and work diligently you will become a productive member of society and be welcome in this country. Over the last year I have traveled to our public institutions to speak with many students, particularly international and undocumented students who felt that the anti-immigrant sentiment they were feeling  on a daily basis was impacting their ability to study, learn, and contribute to their communities. The fear was palpable and now we know it was justified.

The fundamental purpose of the BHE is to promote higher education in the Commonwealth to the benefit of all members of our society. We can only hope that our judicial and legislative branches of government will address the changing reality impacting DACA students. I will keep you apprised of developments and will bring forward proposals for your discussion that will help us find a solution that is just and fair. I know that Chair Gabrieli shares these sentiments and I thank him for his steadfast support of all students in the Commonwealth.

C. Santiago 

The Dream is Now

FSU Protecting Your Privacy

Framingham State University will not disclose private information about our students, faculty, or staff to law enforcement officers unless presented with a warrant, subpoena, court order or other legal requirement, or authorized by the student. Framingham State University Police will not act as agents for or assist the federal government in immigration enforcement actions unless required by law.

FSU Health Center

All FSU students are eligible for health care with no copay and no insurance at the Health Center - it is covered by their student fees. We refer students to free STI clinics for testing if they do not have or do not want to use insurance. We also carry many sample medications for treating infections and run free pregnancy tests, rapid strep and mono tests. An appointment would be needed (walk in or call 508-626-4900 to book one appointment (same day is usually available).

We offer free cold care kits with things like cough drops and ibuprofen/tylenol, decongestant and disposable thermometers to all students. If any student is in need of these items, simply ask at the front desk - no appointment needed.

A number of the nurses in the Health Center volunteer at MetroWest Free Medical Program in Framingham and/or Sudbury. All medical services, including women's health and eye exams are available at the program. Interpreters for Spanish and Portuguese are always on-site. The clinic sees anyone in need, regardless of immigration status. The website is: http://metrowestfreemedicalprogram.org/  with links to Spanish and Portuguese pages. The clinic is for all ages, so even if the students have Health Insurance and access here on campus, their family members may benefit from this program.

The Health Center is very interested in being a resource for students, especially at this time. All of our services are confidential and we never share any information with anyone without explicit permission from the student.